Pulsedriver

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KICKER MAIN WEB.gif

Pulsedriver

549.00

3D printing clay with harmonic movement to produce sculptures. Our unique inPulse driver simply mounts on the 3D printer bed below the object you are printing.

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We have been working on this concept of marrying 3D printing Cramics with harmonic movement to produce 3D sculptures for quite some time. Our unique Pulse driver simply mounts on any 3D printer bed below the object you are printing.

 There are many different ways of importing impulses into the structure, including simple rhythmic sounds from either your favorite musical composition (as long as it has enough bass) or frequency generator. 3D Potter Pulse driver is very similar to a Bone Conduction Transducer but it is not a modified speaker, this is a purpose-built driver for this application. All you need in addition to our Pulse driver is a amplifier capable of delivering enough power and bass to achieve your desired rhythmic designs and a frequency generator.

This is only the beginning of the possibilities that can be achieved with this 3D Potter Pulse driver. You are only limited by your imagination to the type of sculptures and designs you will be able to achieve.

Now little bit more about the pulse driver.  This driver can be mounted on basically any printer. So it does not have to have a traveling platform, it can be a stationary platform of the traditional 3D printer configuration. The pulse driver is manufactured from aluminum and the bat (which is the piece the print sits on top of) is an aircraft grade CNC milled part. 

 

In this video we will demonstrate and discuss some of the new techniques and equipment available for harmonic distortion in our 3D printed ceramic vessels and prints.

This is what's included with your purchase:

Frequency generator  App ,amplifier ,pulse generator plus all of the hook ups for operation

 

 

This is our latest pulse driver design utilizing a dual band frequency generator , we take that signal and amplify it to the desired texture.  By varying the print speed with the frequency and also the amplitude you can achieve just about any texture.  We have also experimented with music  compositions as  the driving force for the pulsation and this is going to be very interesting. It takes a little bit of work to get the right composition and the right amplitude

I would like to talk a little bit about the clay and the machine. This technique requires somewhat stiff clay because of the vibrating pulsation by the pulse driver underneath. If you have a loose mixture the clay is  just going to settle from the vibration. Our 3D Potterbot has a direct nozzle extruder which  means the clay (which can even be undiluted clay, very thick clay) goes directly into the extruder and comes out directly from the nozzle without any hoses or augers or anything in between. This allows us to be able to extrude some of the heaviest clay possible of any machine out there.

Our machine has a huge advantage that we can print using the pulse driver  to relatively large heights. For instance without the pulse driver we have been able to achieve up to 22" of unsupported vessels this is just not possible with a thin diluted clay solution that is necessary in compressed air and auger systems. 

 

Here are a couple of  PRS about our impulse driver

    Just for fun The Lazarus Bowl was supposedly a religious relic that served as the plot device for Wayne Federman's film, The Lazarus Bowl. Dana Scully first mentioned it to Fox Mulder. Scully described a nun at her Catholic school jokingly referred to as Sister Spooky who claimed that the aunt of Lazarus had been making a clay bowl when Jesus Christresurrected Lazarus. The words of Christ were then recorded in the grooves of the bowl much like a phonograph record. While investigating the bombing of Augustine O'Fallon's church, Federman found broken pieces of a clay pot that may have been such a relic. Charles Burks performed sonic analysis on it and indeed found audio data within the grooves. The first part of the data translated into: I am the walrus. I am the walrus. Paul is dead. Goo goo ga joo. However, the word "walrus" was literally presented as "bearded, cow-like sea beast." The second part of the data was more unsettling: it was of someone commanding someone else to rise from the dead and was recorded in Aramaic, the language of Christ. The authenticity of the artifact was never fully determined, however. (TXF: "Hollywood A.D.")

 

 

Just for fun

The Lazarus Bowl was supposedly a religious relic that served as the plot device for Wayne Federman's film, The Lazarus BowlDana Scully first mentioned it to Fox Mulder. Scully described a nun at her Catholic school jokingly referred to as Sister Spooky who claimed that the aunt of Lazarus had been making a clay bowl when Jesus Christresurrected Lazarus. The words of Christ were then recorded in the grooves of the bowl much like a phonograph record. While investigating the bombing of Augustine O'Fallon's church, Federman found broken pieces of a clay pot that may have been such a relic. Charles Burks performed sonic analysis on it and indeed found audio data within the grooves. The first part of the data translated into:

I am the walrus. I am the walrus. Paul is dead. Goo goo ga joo.

However, the word "walrus" was literally presented as "bearded, cow-like sea beast." The second part of the data was more unsettling: it was of someone commanding someone else to rise from the dead and was recorded in Aramaic, the language of Christ.

The authenticity of the artifact was never fully determined, however. (TXF: "Hollywood A.D.")